Media Coverage

Media Coverage

UCLA BRITE Center and UCLA Center for Neighborhood Knowledge Develop Model to Identify Areas That Should Have Priority for Vaccine, and Other COVID-19 Relief

To help slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, UCLA public health and urban planning experts have developed a predictive model that pinpoints which populations in which neighborhoods of Los Angeles County are most at risk of becoming infected.

The researchers hope the new model, which can be applied to other counties and jurisdictions as well, will assist decision makers, public health officials and scientists in effectively and equitably implementing vaccine distribution, testing, closures and reopenings, and other virus-mitigation measures.

The model maps Los Angeles County neighborhood by neighborhood, based on four important indicators known to significantly increase a person’s medical vulnerability to COVID-19 infection — preexisting medical conditions, barriers to accessing health care, built-environment characteristics and socioeconomic challenges.

The research data demonstrate that neighborhoods characterized by significant clustering of racial and ethnic minorities, low-income households and unmet medical needs are most vulnerable to COVID-19 infection, specifically areas in and around South Los Angeles and the eastern portion of the San Fernando Valley. Communities along the coast and in the northwestern part of the county, which are disproportionately white and higher-income, were found to be the least vulnerable.

“The model we have includes specific resource vulnerabilities that can guide public health officials and local leaders across the nation to harness already available local data to determine which groups in which neighborhoods are most vulnerable and how to prevent new infections to save lives,” said research author Vickie Mays, a professor of psychology in the UCLA College and of health policy and management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Mays, who also directs the National Institutes of Health–funded UCLA BRITE Center for Science, Research and Policy, worked with urban planner Paul Ong, director of the UCLA Center for Neighborhood Knowledge, to develop the indicators model, along with study co-authors Chhandara Pech and Nataly Rios Gutierrez. The maps were created by Abigail Fitzgibbon.

Utilizing data from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research’s California Health Interview Survey, the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and the California Department of Parks and Recreation, the researchers were able to determine how the four vulnerability indicators differentially predicted which racial and ethnic groups in Los Angeles County were the most vulnerable to infection based on their geographical residence.

Racial and ethnic groups with the highest vulnerability

  • Preexisting conditions. The authors found that 73% of Black residents live in neighborhoods with the highest rates of preexisting health conditions like diabetes, obesity and heart disease, as well as poor overall health and food insecurity. This was followed by 70% of Latinos and 60% of Cambodians, Hmongs and Laotians, or CHL. Conversely, 60% of white residents live in areas with low or the lowest vulnerability.
  • Barriers to accessing services. Forty percent of Latinos, 29% of Blacks, 22% of CHL and 16% of other Asians reside in neighborhoods with the greatest barriers to health care, characterized by high proportions of nonU.S. citizens, poorEnglish-language ability, a lack of access to computer broadband service, lower rates of health insurance and poor access to vehicles for medical purposes. Only 7% of whites live in these neighborhoods.
  • Built-environment risk. Sixty-three percent of CHL, 55% of Latinos, 53% of Blacks and 32% of whites live areas considered to be at high or the highest vulnerability due to built-environment challenges, which include high population density, crowded housing and a lack of parks and open spaces.
  • Social vulnerability. According to the Centers for Disease Control, neighborhoods with high social vulnerability are characterized by lower socioeconomic status and education attainment, a higher prevalence of single-parent and multigenerational households, greater housing density, poorer English-language ability and a lack of access to vehicles, among other factors. While only 8% of whites live in these neighborhoods, 42% of both Blacks and Latinos do, as do 38% of CHL.

How the model can help with COVID-19 mitigation efforts

“When the pandemic hit, we were slowed down by a lack of science and a lack of understanding of the ways in which health disparities in the lives of some of our most vulnerable populations made their risk of COVID-19 infection even greater,” Mays said. “We thought elderly and people in nursing homes were the most vulnerable, yet we found that lacking a number of social resources contributes to a greater likelihood of getting infected as well.”

And while nationwide statistics have shown that the virus has had a disproportionate effect on low-income communities and communities of color, knowing precisely which populations are the most vulnerable and where new infections are likely to occur is critical information in determining how to allocate scarce resources and when to open or close areas, Mays and Ong said.

If, for example, English-language ability is a barrier to accessing health information and services in a vulnerable neighborhood, health officials should develop campaigns in Spanish or another appropriate language highlighting the availability of testing, the researchers stress. If access to a car is a barrier for families in an at-risk area, walk-up testing sites should be made available. When crowded housing in a high-risk neighborhood is the predominant housing stock, testing resources should be set up for entire households and hotel vouchers made available to help with quarantining after a positive test.

The data can also provide critical knowledge and insights to social service providers, emergency agencies and volunteers on where to direct their time and resources, such as where to set up distribution sites for food and other necessities. And importantly, identifying the areas and populations with the highest vulnerability will help decision-makers equitably prioritize vaccine-distribution plans to include the most vulnerable early.

In the longer term, the researchers say, the model will also provide valuable information to urban planners so that they can target specific areas for the development of less-dense housing and more parks and open spaces, creating healthier neighborhoods that can better withstand future pandemics while promoting equity in long-term health outcomes.

Read the full study report here

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Vickie Mays Featured by APA’s Office of Ethnic Minority Affairs

Dr Vickie Mays, featured as notable ethnic minority psychologist for her contributions HIV and AIDS research as part of the American Psychological Association’s Ethnicity and Health in America Series which focuses on chronic health condition relevant to a particular ethnic group honored during certain months during the year. Read more… микрозаймы онлайн

Bruins stand in solidarity with Mizzou students protesting racist incidents

Hundreds of students, faculty members, staff and alumni rallied in front of Powell Library Thursday afternoon, supporting students at the University of Missouri who are protesting racially charged incidents on their campus.

The Afrikan Student Union, which led the rally, and faculty members spoke to a crowd of 200 about the similarities between racial issues at the University of Missouri and UCLA. They also chanted “Black Bruins Matter” with posters and fists held in the air.

Read the full article here срочный займ на карту онлайн

UCLA Program Aims to Help Local Women at Risk for Heart Disease

As part of a UCLA-sponsored program which aims to understand how mobile phones and smartphones can be used to empower individuals to make lifestyle changes, several ladies from the Faithful Central Bible Church congregation were given a smartphone app to help them achieve their own heathy lifestyle goals. The app used each of the lady’s eating and activity patterns to deliver to her tailored advice on healthy diet and exercise habits.

Two studies within the UCLA-sponsored program are currently looking for volunteers. If you are interested in joining one of these studies or want more information please contact

Nabil Alshurafa: nabil@cs.ucla.edu

OR

Jo-Ann Eastwood: jeastwoo@sonnet.ucla.edu

 

To read a recent LA Times article highlighting the program click here. hairy girls

The Myth Of Mental Illness And Gun Violence

Center Director Vickie Mays mentioned in FORBES opinion piece on “Mental Illness and Reduction of Gun Violence and Suicide: Bringing Epidemiologic Research to Policy” article in Annals of Epidemiology. Continue reading…

Rivers Remarkable in Guiding Clippers through Owner Sterling’s Scandal

Center Director, Vickie Mays, offers praise on Rivers’ Handling of Donald Sterling scandal. Continue reading…

Health Insurance Options for Same-Sex Couples

Same-sex marriage is not recognized by the federal government, which creates complications for such couples. Here, experts give tips on navigating the health insurance marketplace. Continue reading…

The New Yorker – Counting Japan’s Dead

Women in Los Angeles County are becoming less healthy, and their well-being is expected to decline further because of the slumping economy and other factors that deter access to better food and exercise, according to a sweeping study released Wednesday. Continue reading…

Pasadena Star-News – Startling New Statistics on Women’s Health

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays is quoted in an article on a Los Angeles County survey of more than 3,500 women, including women 65 and older, those with disabilities, and women who defined themselves as bisexual or lesbian. Continue reading…

NPR – Racism’s Physical Impact

Interview with BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays on the link between race and the shortened life expectancy of African American men. Continue reading…

In the Media

Many Black Californians, would skip COVID-19 vaccine today, survey finds

Center Director Vickie Mays shares her thoughs on new findings from the Public Policy Intitute of California that shows many Black Californians would be reluctant to accept a COVID-19 vaccine if it were available today.

Continue reading…

Dr. Mays Speaks to Popular Science Magazine about COVID-19 Vaccine Trials and the Black Community

Columnist Kate Baggaley speaks to Center Director Vickie Mays and other experts about how past mistreatment by the medical community is factoring in to current efforts to recruit African-Americans for COVID-19 vaccination trials and how the current approach to testing the American population may need rethinking.

Continue reading…

Q&A: Dr Vickie Mays Answers Questions On The Impact Of COVID-19 On Black Communities

Center Director Vickie Mays sat down with Stuart Wolpert to answer questions on how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting Black Americans and her work on a bill requiring better data on the race and ethnicity of people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read the interview here.

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COVID-19: The Psychology of Social Distancing

Dr Vickie Mays speaks on social distancing requirements for COVID-19 from a clinical psychologist point of view.


See the interview here.

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Bruins stand in solidarity with Mizzou students protesting racist incidents

Hundreds of students, faculty members, staff and alumni rallied in front of Powell Library Thursday afternoon, supporting students at the University of Missouri who are protesting racially charged incidents on their campus.

The Afrikan Student Union, which led the rally, and faculty members spoke to a crowd of 200 about the similarities between racial issues at the University of Missouri and UCLA. They also chanted “Black Bruins Matter” with posters and fists held in the air.

Read the full article here срочный займ на карту онлайн

The Myth Of Mental Illness And Gun Violence

Center Director Vickie Mays mentioned in FORBES opinion piece on “Mental Illness and Reduction of Gun Violence and Suicide: Bringing Epidemiologic Research to Policy” article in Annals of Epidemiology. Continue reading…

Rivers Remarkable in Guiding Clippers through Owner Sterling’s Scandal

Center Director, Vickie Mays, offers praise on Rivers’ Handling of Donald Sterling scandal. Continue reading…

Christian Science Monitor – Closure Eludes Tornado-Beaten Joplin Amid Search for the Vanished

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays quoted in an article on disaster recovery in Joplin, MO.  Continue reading…

The New Yorker – Counting Japan’s Dead

Women in Los Angeles County are becoming less healthy, and their well-being is expected to decline further because of the slumping economy and other factors that deter access to better food and exercise, according to a sweeping study released Wednesday. Continue reading…

Pasadena Star-News – Startling New Statistics on Women’s Health

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays is quoted in an article on a Los Angeles County survey of more than 3,500 women, including women 65 and older, those with disabilities, and women who defined themselves as bisexual or lesbian. Continue reading…

NPR – Racism’s Physical Impact

Interview with BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays on the link between race and the shortened life expectancy of African American men. Continue reading…

Los Angeles Times – The Toll of Racism? The Stress of Discrimination, Real or Perceived, May Be Shortening Black Men’s Lives

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays is quoted in article about the physiological response to racism. Continue reading…

Jet Magazine – Research Shows that Racism May Affect the Health and Medical Care of Blacks

Article quotes BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays and references BRITE Center research on interventions to lessen the negative impact of discrimination on health. Continue reading…

The Boston Globe – How Racism Hurts – Literally

Article quotes BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays and cites BRITE Center research on the brain’s circuits and structures during laboratory conditions of discrimination and whether responses vary based on lifelong exposure to racial prejudice. Continue reading…

Death by Discrimination?

One of my first assignments as a reporter was to interview a cartoonist who lived on Chicago’s Gold Coast, a sliver of affluence set between Lake Michigan and a nasty housing project. Killing time before the interview, I stopped at a jeweler and asked the price of a watch in the window. The manager ducked into a storeroom and led out an enormous Doberman, straining at its leash. With a snarl that matched the dog’s, she said, ”Now, may I help you?” The cartoonist was not much better. She opened the door a crack then shut it in my face. Continue reading…

Lies Men Tell Put Women in Danger of AIDS

One of my first assignments as a reporter was to interview a cartoonist who lived on Chicago’s Gold Coast, a sliver of affluence set between Lake Michigan and a nasty housing project. Killing time before the interview, I stopped at a jeweler and asked the price of a watch in the window. The manager ducked into a storeroom and led out an enormous Doberman, straining at its leash. With a snarl that matched the dog’s, she said, ”Now, may I help you?” The cartoonist was not much better. She opened the door a crack then shut it in my face. Continue reading…

Center News Archives

UCLA BRITE Center and UCLA Center for Neighborhood Knowledge Develop Model to Identify Areas That Should Have Priority for Vaccine, and Other COVID-19 Relief

To help slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, UCLA public health and urban planning experts have developed a predictive model that pinpoints which populations in which neighborhoods of Los Angeles County are most at risk of becoming infected. The researchers hope the new model, which can be applied to other counties and jurisdictions Learn more…

Dr. Mays Speaks to Popular Science Magazine about COVID-19 Vaccine Trials and the Black Community

Columnist Kate Baggaley speaks to Center Director Vickie Mays and other experts about how past mistreatment by the medical community is factoring in to current efforts to recruit African-Americans for COVID-19 vaccination trials and how the current approach to testing the American population may need rethinking.

Q&A: Dr Vickie Mays Answers Questions On The Impact Of COVID-19 On Black Communities

Center Director Vickie Mays sat down with Stuart Wolpert to answer questions on how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting Black Americans and her work on a bill requiring better data on the race and ethnicity of people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Read the interview here. unshaven girl

COVID-19: The Battle to Save Black Lives (Virtual Town Hall)

Center Director Vickie Mays will speak as part of a panel Thursday, April 30, from 12 to 1:30 p.m on the health, economic, and social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Black communities during a virtual town hall meeting presented by the Minority Health Institute. Other panelists include: Richard Allen Williams, M.D., FACC, FAHA, FACP*President Learn more…

Center Director Vickie Mays Recognized by Colleagues for Service

Dr Vickie Mays was awarded the Academic Senate’s 2020 Senate Service Award for service to the university. Each year the Senate Service Award is given to a faculty member who most demonstrates UCLA’s mission of education, research, and service.

Center Director Vickie Mays Receives Career Commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Award

Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays received the Career Commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Award from the UCLA Academic Senate for her contributions in research, student development, and community service through research that focuses on women and ethnic minorities and community-based curricula that creates pathways into research and higher education for underrepresented communities. The award Learn more…

BRITE Center Recruiting Koreans Ages 18-19 for Advisory Board Position

BRITE Center research study is seeking Koreans ages 18-19 to serve on our advisory board regarding a study of smoking among Korean youth. If interested in serving on our advisory board, please send us an email with your name and contact information. срочный займ

Seeking African-American Males Ages 18-30

The UCLA BRITE Center is seeking African-American males ages 18-30 to helps us learn more about what happens in the brain when someone treats you badly or unfairly just because you are an African American male. Participants will fill out a questionnaire and perform a short computerized task and will receive $20 in cash as Learn more…

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Bruins stand in solidarity with Mizzou students protesting racist incidents

Hundreds of students, faculty members, staff and alumni rallied in front of Powell Library Thursday afternoon, supporting students at the University of Missouri who are protesting racially charged incidents on their campus. The Afrikan Student Union, which led the rally, and faculty members spoke to a crowd of 200 about the similarities between racial issues Learn more…

Racism and African-American Men

BRITE Center Director was recently quoted in an article out of the San Francisco Bay View newspaper. The article brings attention to the understudied problem of the real effects on physical health racism and discrimination can have. The BRITE Center is currently seeking men ages 40 and older who have experienced racism and have a Learn more…

UCLA Program Aims to Help Local Women at Risk for Heart Disease

As part of a UCLA-sponsored program which aims to understand how mobile phones and smartphones can be used to empower individuals to make lifestyle changes, several ladies from the Faithful Central Bible Church congregation were given a smartphone app to help them achieve their own heathy lifestyle goals. The app used each of the lady’s eating Learn more…

The Myth Of Mental Illness And Gun Violence

Center Director Vickie Mays mentioned in FORBES opinion piece on “Mental Illness and Reduction of Gun Violence and Suicide: Bringing Epidemiologic Research to Policy” article in Annals of Epidemiology.

Experts Urge WHO to Stop Classifying Sexual Orientation Issues as ‘Disorders’

A working group evaluating the International Classification of Diseases, the World Health Organization’s standard diagnostic tool, has recommended that sexual orientation–related disorders be deleted from the publication’s disease classification system. The group, which includes UCLA Fielding School of Health professor Susan D. Cochran, says the removal of these disorders will make getting health care easier Learn more…

Rivers Remarkable in Guiding Clippers through Owner Sterling’s Scandal

Center Director, Vickie Mays, offers praise on Rivers’ Handling of Donald Sterling scandal.

Mental Illness, Gun Violence, and Gun Policy

Scholars say that, overall, gun violence can be reduced by instituting a risk-based approach to firearms possession and purchases.

Google Hangout Test

[wphangouts] payday loan

Healthy Living Project

Date: Saturday, May 31, 2014 Time: 10AM-1PM Where: Mar Vista Gardens Community Center Prizes! Fun for the whole family! Learn to train your dog! Raffles! Come learn how to live a more positive and healthy lifestyle while also being visited by some very cute and lovable service animals.       unshaven girl

BRITE Students Antonio Shallowhorn and Justin Kwok Selected to Present at Psychology Undergraduate Research Conference (PURC)

The Psychology Undergraduate Research Conference (PURC), was established in 1992 by Dr Elizabeth Bjork to give students an opportunity to develop their presentation skills and share their research efforts with peers and colleagues. Since then PURC has steadily grown in the number of applicants and in visibility and now includes students from across the country doing research Learn more…

Center Article Receives Recognition as Most Cited

A new report published in the Journal of Black Psychology lists an article published in 1994 by Center staff as being one of the most highly cited articles to be published in the Journal of Black Psychology. The report is a twelve year content analysis of articles published in the Journal of Black Psychology from Learn more…

Ethics & Behavior Special Issue

The Legacy of the U. S. Public Health Service Study of Untreated Syphilis in African American Men, in Health Care Reform and the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act

Science 2.0 – Gays, Bisexuals Twice As Likely To Seek Mental Health Or Substance Abuse Treatment

Article highlights work by Center researcher Susan Cochran and Director Vickie Mays.

Cal State San Bernardino receives $4million NIH grant for health disparities research

Vickie Mays asked to serve on advisory board of grant to create a center to promote research and training on health inequities found among differing racial, economic and ethnic groups in the United States. займы на карту

amfAR – Letter to Secretary Sebelius on Research and the National Strategy

Dr. Mays was one of over 30 academic researchers and leaders in AIDS research and treatment that signed on to a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services asking for an increase in HIV/AIDS and health research funding across federal agencies.

Los Angeles Daily News – Aid May Help Save Lives of Babies

Dr. Mays was interviewed for this article on the high infant mortality rate among African American women in Los Angeles county.

American Psychological Association – Science Leadership Meeting Send Psychologists to Capitol Hill

Dr. Mays moderated a panel on intervention research at the meeting for members of Congress.

Institute of Medicine Committee Releases New Healthy People 2020 Indicators

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays contributed to recommendations for 12 indicators and 24 objectives to guide a national health agenda.

Dr. Mays Op-Ed in the New York Times: How to Close the Race Gap in H.I.V.

Center Director Vickie Mays contributed to the New York Times’ recent debate on how public health officials can fight the spread of H.I.V. among young gay black men.

Professor Mays to Fill Seat on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics
Dr. Vickie Mays Appointed to New Institute of Medicine Committee

Work will review systems for HIV/AIDS care.

Christian Science Monitor – Closure Eludes Tornado-Beaten Joplin Amid Search for the Vanished

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays quoted in an article on disaster recovery in Joplin, MO. 

Black Women’s Health Imperative – Discrimination Contributes to African American Health Disparities

Article covers report by BRITE Center researchers Dr. Vickie Mays, Susan Cochran and Namdi Barnes on race-based discrimination and health. 

NPR – Women and Post-Disaster Depression

Interview with BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays and New Orleans resident Viola Washington on the stress caused by disaster and paths to recovery.

The New Yorker – Counting Japan’s Dead

Women in Los Angeles County are becoming less healthy, and their well-being is expected to decline further because of the slumping economy and other factors that deter access to better food and exercise, according to a sweeping study released Wednesday.

Pasadena Star-News – Startling New Statistics on Women’s Health

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays is quoted in an article on a Los Angeles County survey of more than 3,500 women, including women 65 and older, those with disabilities, and women who defined themselves as bisexual or lesbian.

Thousands Attend NIH Summit on Eliminating Health Disparities

(Psychological Science Agenda) Center Director Vickie Mays participated as a panelist in two workshops—one concerning the collection of data on race and ethnicity, and the other on the next decade of HIV in the United States.

NPR – Racism’s Physical Impact

Interview with BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays on the link between race and the shortened life expectancy of African American men.

Los Angeles Times – The Toll of Racism? The Stress of Discrimination, Real or Perceived, May Be Shortening Black Men’s Lives

BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays is quoted in article about the physiological response to racism.

Jet Magazine – Research Shows that Racism May Affect the Health and Medical Care of Blacks

Article quotes BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays and references BRITE Center research on interventions to lessen the negative impact of discrimination on health.

The Boston Globe – How Racism Hurts – Literally

Article quotes BRITE Center Director Dr. Vickie Mays and cites BRITE Center research on the brain’s circuits and structures during laboratory conditions of discrimination and whether responses vary based on lifelong exposure to racial prejudice.